Causes Heart Palpitations?

Posted by Anna (Kahului, Hawaii) on 07/02/2007

I read all of the information and people feedbacks on your web site. Now TED is saying only hydrogenated coconut oil will cause heart palpitations etc. That is so NOT true! I took virgin coconut oil for one week and my heart started to race. Please watch what you advise people.

Replied by Ted
Bangkok, Thailand
383 posts

Dear Sheena:

The problem that worries me is whether the coconut oil you used was hydrogenated coconut oil that was responsible, and commercially sold coconut oil tends to hide that fact. Most studies on the issue of high blood pressure, heart problem are associated with the use of coconut oil. If this is the problem, it is best to stop taking it a possible hydrogenated coconut oil in question.

The best solution is to take fish oil omega 3 to neutralized the suspected hydrogenated coconut oil as it exerts the opposite effect of in neutralizing tachycardia and arrhythmias.

The interesting issues is both a low fat and a high fat with hydrogenated coconut oil AND other vegetable oil can also initiate this problem. In a study they used the following (source of study in its entirely the abstract I pasted below this posting):

"rats given a low-fat chow diet or one enriched with 10% hydrogenated coconut oil, corn oil, linseed oil or sardine oil."

Yes, sardine oil is the fish oil omega 3 which you might use cheaply, of course possibly from eating sardines. The result of that study they found:

"The incidence of ventricular fibrillation was 75% in the low-fat group, 67% in the coconut-oil group, 44% in the corn-oil group, 40% in the linseed-oil group and 10% in the fish-oil group. The time until the first occurrence of extrasystole, the incidence of ventricular tachycardia and the incidence of reperfusion-induced ventricular fibrillation were influenced in a similar manner."

Therefore, just take sardine oil, or omega 3 fish oil as a way of reducing it, and stop using a suspected hydrogenated vegetable oils. In the future, it is best to balance them omega 3 fish oil (polyunsaturated fats) balance them with some other oils such as non-hydrogenated coconut oil. To solve the issue of blood pressure and arrthythmias by taking 1/2 tablespoons of each.

The body also needs to alkalize to avoid high blood pressure such as taking either one or done alteratively:

1. 2 tablespoon of Apple cider vinegar plus 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda in 1/2 glass of water minimum taken 2 times a day on an empty stomach.

2. 8 teaspoon of freshly squeezed lime plus 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda in 1/2 glass of water minimum taken two times a day on an empty stomach.

The two formulas will balance the sodium and potassium close ratio to the body's extracellular fluid as well as the body's optimal pH, and the body's Oxidation Reduction Potential (ORP), without the need to buy expensive machines that is lacking bicarbonates, sodium and potassium, but only produce just the negative ORP.

The other issue is that, sometimes the body needs a break. Such as 4 or 5 days out of 7 days is taken, giving the body a needed 3 days rest. The other issue is one of balance. And the third issue is that the body also needs to emulsify fats. If I were to take 1 tablespoon of any oils, uncooked unheated, preferably cold press I need to take also 1 tablespoon of granulated powdered lecithin (which is oil free) so that the body can best process the oils by being able to rid of the excess being the key.

Everything is about balance. Mother nature deals with equilibrium, our body is always in the state of homeostasis (balance) to be healthy. We get sick when such state is not achieved. In ancient philosophy, it is the Middle Path in Buddhism, it is the Ying and Yang in Chinese Philosophy. In Western analogy, it is day and night, black and white, etc. In the body's own blood pH, that equilibrium is about 7.35, or urine pH close to 7, the further off that value we simply get sick. Our body also works in cycles, and the body also needs a rest too.

Ted


Differential effects of various oil diets on the risk of cardiac arrhythmias in rats.

Isensee H, Jacob R. Institute of Physiology II, University of Tubingen, Germany. J Cardiovasc Risk 1994 Dec;1(4):353-359

BACKGROUND: Independently of the problem of atherogenesis, the amount and type of fat intake influences the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. However, the relative effectiveness of different fats and the underlying mechanisms are controversial. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of various oil-enriched diets on the risk of ventricular arrhythmias in rat hearts under conditions of ischaemia and reperfusion and to help clarify the mechanisms underlying the differing effects of the oils on the occurrence of arrhythmias. METHODS: Over a 10-week period, we studied five groups of young male Wistar rats given a low-fat chow diet or one enriched with 10% hydrogenated coconut oil, corn oil, linseed oil or sardine oil. Electrocardiograms were recorded from the isolated hearts (Langendorff preparation) perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution. Ischaemia was induced by a 20 min occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. In another series of experiments, a 10 min occlusion was followed by a 20 min reperfusion period. The times between the first occurrence of extrasystole and the incidence of ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation were determined. The size of the ischaemic zone was assessed using malachite green. The fatty acid composition of the myocardial tissue was analysed using gas chromatography. RESULTS: An increase in the risk of ventricular arrhythmias under conditions of both ischaemia and reperfusion was obvious in the rats that consumed large quantities of saturated fatty acids (coconut oil) and in the group with a very low intake of fat. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly fish oil, exerted a protective effect. The incidence of ventricular fibrillation was 75% in the low-fat group, 67% in the coconut-oil group, 44% in the corn-oil group, 40% in the linseed-oil group and 10% in the fish-oil group. The time until the first occurrence of extrasystole, the incidence of ventricular tachycardia and the incidence of reperfusion-induced ventricular fibrillation were influenced in a similar manner. The size of the ischaemic zone was significantly reduced in the groups given diets enriched with PUFAs. All protective effects were abolished, however, by cyclooxygenase inhibition with aspirin. The fatty acid composition of myocardial tissue, the ratio of n-3 to n-6 fatty acids and the double-bond index were significantly affected by the various diets. CONCLUSION: Whereas saturated fatty acids are obviously proarrhythmic, diets enriched with n-6 or n-3 PUFAs both exert antiarrhythmic effects. Although n-3 fatty acids seem to be more effective, cardioprotection cannot simply be related to the replacement of n-6 by n-3 fatty acids in cardiac membrane phospholipids, given the beneficial effects of corn oil. In any case, replacement of n-3 by n-6 fatty acids is not the underlying mechanism. The overall reduction of prostaglandin formation cannot be the primary mechanism because the beneficial effects of diets rich in PUFAs were abolished by cyclooxygenase inhibition. We conlcude that, besides prostacyclin (PGI2 or PGI3), membrane fluidity and accompanying alterations in functional membrane proteins (e.g. protection from calcium overload) are key factors apart from vascular effects that influence the size of the ischaemic zone.


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