Menopause Remedies - Ted's Q&A

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Melasma Remedies

Posted by Lorraine on 07/16/2006

I was reading about Melasma treatments. I would like to try some of your Melasma remedies, but could you please post or send me the exact amounts to use for each cure. You indicate to use certain oils, ect., but you don't say how much to use. Please give exact amounts. THANKS!

Replied by Ted
Bangkok, Thailand
383 posts

Dear Lorraine: The amount of usage for the condition of melasma is simple enough. If we are talking about a 50% lavender + 50% tea tree oil solution, you apply it liberally. The frequency of application of this is to keep it there throughout the day. So I guess 3-4 times per day is ideal. Apply enough so that it covers your skin, but not too much so that it drips down or make a mess. The same applies for all other formulas. You only apply in the area being treated, and should go a bit beyond the area to prevent it from such spread.

In case of a vitamin B3 niacinamide, it is about a 10% concentration + 10% DMSO plus 80% water. Make that solution and apply in the same manner as before at about twice or three times per day, equally spread out throughout the day.

As to the number of application a copper chloride is applied at only once a week, and not to go more frequent than once every three or four days. In some cases the blue color of copper chloride might show on your skin if you apply too frequent enough. However, in practice I have never seen that happen, perhaps I don't apply it too frequent. If it does turn slightly blue it means you apply it too frequent. The blue color will eventually disappear if you stop the application long enough. However, the copper chloride should not be apply that frequent.

Of course my favorite remedy is the old tea tree+lavender oil. Partly because it is antifungal, the other is the fact that it is oil, it stays on your skin longer than most water based solution, making it quite effective. You might ask why just tea tree oil and lavender, why not other oils. Other oils will work too, but the issue is two fold: availability and price. These two issue seems to be major problems most people have when using my remedies.

Boric acid solution I have mixed feelings. Sometimes they work quite well and on other times they seem to work rather slowly. Putting too much might cause skin irritation and putting too little won't work. Much of the problem has to do with boric acid being a water based solution where you mixed in water. So the staying power of boric acid is rather limited when applied to a hydrophobic (water hating) skin. However, if you have it around your house, just apply them liberally and as often as you like, ideally about 4-8 times per day to make sure it works in light of limited staying power on the skin.

It should never be forgotten that both vinegar, apple cideer and hydrogen peroxide (3%) have antifungal properties necessary to treat melasma. The problem about this formulas is the staying power to kill after a single application. Vinegar, apple cider vinegar and hydrogen peroxide tends to evaporate quite quickly that fungus can come back. The staying power is limited, however this works too. The other issue is the smell people have of vinegar, apple cider vinegar and hydrogen peroxide. Most melasma tends to be in facial region or arms for example so having a vinegary smell or a chlorine like smell, may cause social embarassment. I should know!

I once did an experiment on myself (cheap lab rat - cost nothing) by taking a bath in pure vinegar, then I had to teach a small class. You can imagine how students reacted to this "walking and talking pickles"!