How to Get Rid of Too Much Potassium in Cells



How do I get rid of too much potassium in my cells? I have been
drinking water softened with potassium chloride for five years and, through a hair test, found that I have an imbalance of too much potassium and too little sodium. How do I change that? We have switched to distilled water, but that hasn't helped. I have trouble with swollen ankles, feet and lower legs. How can I change that imbalance? Thanks much



Potassium Fact Sheet

Potassium is a mineral that helps regulate fluids and mineral balance and is needed for muscle contractions and transmission of nerve impulses. It also helps regulate blood pressure; an important role considering one in five Americans is living with hypertension.

What are the Effects of Potassium Deficiency?
Potassium deficiency can result in high blood pressure, stroke, congestive heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, weakness, depression and glucose intolerance, as well as increased risk of kidney stones, and increased bone turnover.

Potassium plays such an important role in blood pressure regulation and stroke prevention that the Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of the health claim "diets containing foods that are good sources of potassium and low in sodium may reduce the risk of high blood pressure and stroke," for foods that are naturally low in sodium, fat, and cholesterol, and provide at least 350 mg of potassium per serving.

How Much Potassium is Needed?
Until recently no official recommendation for potassium intake existed, although many health professionals recommended 2 grams a day. But in February of 2004, after an extensive review of scientific literature, the Institute of Medicine set the Adequate Intake of potassium for adults at 4.7 grams a day - more than double previous estimates. However, more than 90% of American children and adults are not meeting these recommendations.

What are the Effects of Potassium Deficiency?
Potassium deficiency can result in high blood pressure, stroke, congestive heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, weakness, depression and glucose intolerance, as well as increased risk of kidney stones, and increased bone turnover(3).

Sources of Potassium (5-7)
Medium baked potato (with skin) 610 mg
8 oz yogurt 490 mg
8 oz yogurt smoothie 424 - 320 mg
1/2 cup pasta sauce 369 mg
8 oz milk 366 mg
6 inch banana 362 mg
1 oz almonds 206 mg
2-3/8" orange 174 mg
1/2 cup cottage cheese 108 mg

Comments...

Many things can affect the levels of potassium in the body. These include - kidney disorders, diarrhea, the overuse of laxatives, cigarette smoking and caffeine.

Warnings:

Patients with renal dysfunction taking potassium supplements or products that contains high amounts of potassium like Noni Juice may be at risk for the development of hyperkalemia. Hyperkalemia is an abnormally high concentration of potassium that can lead to weakness, heart arrhythmia or respiratory arrest.

Info on Potassium from the following website page: http://www.wholehealthmd.com/refshelf/substances_view/1,1525,10086,00.html

"Potassium may help to reduce high blood pressure. Scientists have long known that potassium helps maintain blood pressure. According to the latest studies, people who regularly consume high-potassium foods, such as bananas, avocados, and yogurt, have lower blood pressure than those who don't. For example, in a recent review of 33 studies that examined the effect of potassium on blood pressure, researchers discovered that participants who started out with normal blood pressure and then added 2,340 mg of potassium daily (from foods, supplements, or both) were able to lower their risk of developing high blood pressure by 25%. The reductions were ultimately greatest for people who already had high blood pressure.

A potassium-rich diet may even enable people with high blood pressure to slash their daily dose of prescription medication. In one study of 54 adults with high blood pressure, the majority (81%) of those who were placed on a high-potassium diet--they ate three to six servings of potassium-rich foods daily--were able to safely and dramatically reduce their dosage of high blood pressure medications within 12 months. In contrast, only 29% of those who continued with their normal diets were able to do so.

Most adults easily get an adequate and safe amount of potassium--about 5.6 g--from foods every day. In fact, there is no RDA for potassium. By law, over-the-counter supplements cannot contain more than 99 mg of potassium per pill, a ruling that applies to multivitamin and mineral preparations as well. Higher doses are available only by prescription and are necessary only in very special situations, such as the use of diuretics that promote potassium loss.

If You Get Too Little

A seriously low level of potassium--a condition called hypokalemia--is an uncommon event but can occur in people who lose large amounts of fluid from severe diarrhea, sweating, or vomiting. Hypokalemia occurs most frequently among people who take diuretics--medications that promote urination and thus lessen the volume of fluid in the body. Although these drugs often help in regulating blood pressure, they also promote the excretion of potassium through the urine, posing the risk for very low potassium levels and related muscle cramps and fatigue.

Some rare endocrine disorders (Liddle's syndrome, Bartter's syndrome, Fanconi's syndrome) are also associated with hypokalemia. In the rare case of a severe potassium deficiency, muscle weakness, muscle twitching, paralysis, and abnormal heart rhythms may develop.

It's important to remember that in virtually all cases of short-term diarrhea, potassium imbalances are slight and temporary. The body corrects itself without the need for any additional supplementation. It's only when diarrhea is prolonged, or accompanied by dehydration, that problems with low potassium can cause real complications that may require professionally administered intravenous fluids (possibly including potassium, sodium, and other electrolytes). Such treatment typically corrects the imbalance in a few hours.

If You Get Too Much

Most people can safely absorb up to 18 g of potassium a day. In fact, potassium toxicity--a condition called hyperkalemia--is very unlikely to occur unless you take potassium supplements inappropriately or your kidneys don't function properly. That's because the kidneys carefully monitor the balance of potassium in the body and excrete any excess.

However, if your kidneys are malfunctioning for some reason and can't properly process and eliminate potassium as a result, you may develop toxic levels of potassium in your bloodstream by taking supplements. Signs of too much potassium in your body include muscle fatigue and an irregular heartbeat (cardiac arrhythmia).

General Dosage Information


For high blood pressure: Consume potassium-rich foods daily. Because of the risk of toxicity, however, don't take potassium in supplement form without professional supervision.

Guidelines for Use
To reduce the risk of stomach upset and nausea with potassium supplements that your doctor has prescribed, always take them with food.

General Interaction
Definitely avoid potassium supplements if you take drugs known as potassium-sparing diuretics (amiloride, spironolactone, triamterene), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), beta-blockers, or an ACE inhibitor for high blood pressure or angina. Always consult a doctor under such circumstances, because combining any of these drugs with potassium can lead to hyperkalemia.

Because of the risk of various complications, consult your doctor before combining a digitalis drug (cardiac glycoside) with supplemental potassium.

Corticosteroids, loop diuretics (such as bumetanide and furosemide), and thiazide diuretics (including hydrochlorothiazide and indapamide) all can lower the level of potassium in the body. Potassium supplementation may be required but should always be undertaken with medical supervision.

Potassium - Drug Interactions
http://www.wholehealthmd.com/refshelf/substances_interact/1,1661,10086,00.html

Acebutolol Hydrochloride
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Amiloride Hydrochloride
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Atenolol
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Atenolol/Chlorthalidone
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Benazepril Hydrochloride
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Betaxolol Oral
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Bisoprolol Fumarate
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Bisoprolol Fumarate/Hydrochlorothiazide
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Captopril
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Carteolol Hydrochloride Oral
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Carvedilol
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Chlorothiazide
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Chlorthalidone
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Digitoxin
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Digoxin
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Enalapril Maleate
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Enalapril Maleate/Diltiazem Malate
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Enalapril Maleate/Felodipine
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Enalapril/Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ)
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Fosinopril Sodium
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ)
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Hydrochlorothiazide/Triamterene
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Indapamide
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Labetalol Hydrochloride
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Levobunolol
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Lisinopril
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Lisinopril/Hydrochlorothiazide
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Metolazone
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Metoprolol
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Moexipril Hydrochloride
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Moexipril Hydrochloride/Hydrochlorothiazide
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Nadolol
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Penbutolol Sulfate
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Pindolol
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Propranolol Hydrochloride
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Propranolol/Hydrochlorothiazide
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Quinapril Hydrochloride
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Ramipril
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Sotalol Hydrochloride
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Spironolactone
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Spironolactone/Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ)
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Timolol Maleate Oral
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Trandolapril
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Trandolapril/Verapamil Hydrochloride
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Triamterene
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.


Valsartan/Hydrochlorothiazide
Do not take together. When taken together, the risk of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) may increase, and lead to serious side effects.

Research all published books on Potassium