Conductivity Meter

Posted by Richard (Brisbane, Australia) on 05/31/2007

Hi, I have a couple of questions for Ted. I purchased a pH meter about a month ago and am slowly working my way to stabilising both urinary & salivary ph levels to around the 6.2 to 6.8 mark. Ted's advice has been most helpful in me achieving this. I am now looking to purchase both a Conductivity and ORP meter. In regard to the conductivity meter, I'm looking at one of two meters. One measures in millisiemens (range 0-19.99ms/cm) and the other in microsiemens (range 0-1999μs/cm). I'm not sure which one would be the most appropriate. As the measuring range on one of the meters only goes up to 1999μs/cm, I understand that you have to multiply the value by 10 to get the correct reading. i.e., a 450 reading on the meter equals 4500 microsiemens. Is this correct? I am also somewhat confused though on what the ideal conductivity reading should be. I have read where Ted has advised that the average urine conductivity is between 4200-4900 microsiemens and elsewhere where he has said that the ideal urinary conductivity should be around 15 millisimens. Correct me if I'm wrong but wouldn't 45000 microsiemens convert to 4.5 millisimens and 15 millisimens convert to 15000 microsiemens? In other words how does an average reading 4500 microsiemens equal 15 millisimens? Finally, I'm having trouble finding a supplier of Disodium EDTA. I live in Australia and have checked out a couple of chemical supplies with no luck. I know Ted does not like recommending anyone but is there anywhere I may source some locally?

Replied by Ted
Bangkok, Thailand
384 posts

Dear Richard: i.e., a 450 reading on the meter equals 4500 microsiemens. Is this correct?

Yes

I have read where Ted has advised that the average urine conductivity is between 4200-4900 microsiemens

In practice, you need not be precise about the conductivity. The issue is simply those general values are o.k. Conductivity is not critical to general health. The problem lies whenever the body is either below 1000 microsiemens, or above 9000 microsiemens. The real issue appears to be the pH, being so problematic and the ORP is one that you need to keep a close eye. As to all the correction the confusion will resolve itself if you buy the conductivity measures either in microsiemens, or millisiemens. I am more comfortable with the microsiemens, but the indicator tells me to multiply that by X 10. The indicator for example shows 450 but I must multiply by 10, to get 4500 microsiemens. Forget the other calculations and just look at this as the basis.

Finally, I'm having trouble finding a supplier of Disodium EDTA. I live in Australia and have checked out a couple of chemical supplies with no luck.

Local sources if disodium EDTA in Thailand are relatively easy to obtain, but suppliers here don't export. There are way too much red tape in Australia to buy for personal use. However, you may get them from chemical suppliers or scientific suppliers that sells disodium EDTA. They have various grades, USP, Technical, etc. and they are usually quite acceptable. In Australia I remember a friend of mine mentions he buys it from a local chemists, but still it is difficult to obtain. So buying from the internet through scientific chemical suppliers should be more acceptable.

One other tips, if you don't mind hurting yourself. If you have a pin, and put blood on a glass slide, and put a glass cover you can actually predict whether you have heart attack or not. Basically blood will not dry evenly if the blood chemistry is messed up, but if it is smooth then you are in good health. This simple measured would have prevent a lot of people with the unexpected stroke or paralysis whenever the blood clumps together caused by acidosis, fatty foods, lack of magnesium, or even too much heavy metal buildup.