Connective Tissue Disorder Causing Joint Pain

Posted by S (UK) on 02/04/2013

Ted, I am fascinated with all your work and wondered if you could advise me, I am currently being tested for connective tissue disorder and have suffered several weeks of joint pain! I am allergic to nuts and seeds and only discovered that 4 years ago a month prior to first episode of joint pain, I have since been tested and also have reactions to cows milk, eggs and wheat.

I have omitted them from my diet and generally feel better but still get some joking pain especially in wrist and forearm.

I take ACV in morning but only 1teaspoon of mixed with honey, and yesterday started on borax as per your remedy. I have checked my own urine ph and it's was 4 prior to starting borax, but now 7.

Is there any other advice you could give me? I live in the uk.

Replied by Ted
Bangkok, Thailand
02/05/2013
384 posts

Susan: Honey is considered dangerous by my standards, as it's over 90% fructose, which is a major cause of all kinds of cancer in over 90% of all my clients. Uric acid comes from fructose also, and causes pain. So no honey. As far as the pain is concerned, it is caused primarily by the presence of anaerobic bacteria. I don't know yet what they are, but they are sometimes killed with DMSO and MSM to the area. Also there is a fungus-like bacteria in the mycobacterium group that causes such pain. Again, DMSO can be applied to the area and MSM can be taken at 1000 mg x 4, and this usually works. In some cases I have used sound therapy to kill them that way.

But I would probably try MSM and DMSO, and avoid any sugar especially honey and sweet fruits. We're technically not designed to consume fructose anyway, we're more glucose oriented and cancer requires fructose to grow.

DMSO is dimethylsulfoxide, a component found in all plants. Check Dr. Stanley Jacob's website. It acts as a carrier for any chemical and goes through the skin. It helps oxygenate them, converting cancer cells to normal cells, must be used together with aloe vera oil to prevent inflammation however.

Ted


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